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Social remittances and the changing transnational political landscape

The term “social remittances” was coined over fifteen years ago to capture the notion that, in addition to money, migration also entails the circulation of ideas, practices, skills, identities, and social capital also circulate between sending and receiving communities. The articles in this special issue, which are primarily about migration and politics, drive forward research on social remittances by examining understudied areas such as Poland, Mali, Cote d'Ivoire, Tunisia, and Senegal. They elucidate transnational politics by showing how emigrants influence social protests, elections, and calls for greater transparency or reform. 

Date of Publication
Type of Resource
Target Audience
Academia
Author
Thomas Lacroix
Peggy Levitt
Ilka Vari-Lavoisier
Source / Publisher
Language
Geographic Scope
Workstream Output
No
Regional Review Process
No
GCM Objectives
Status
Published

Social remittances and the changing transnational political landscape

The term “social remittances” was coined over fifteen years ago to capture the notion that, in addition to money, migration also entails the circulation of ideas, practices, skills, identities, and social capital also circulate between sending and receiving communities. The articles in this special issue, which are primarily about migration and politics, drive forward research on social remittances by examining understudied areas such as Poland, Mali, Cote d'Ivoire, Tunisia, and Senegal. They elucidate transnational politics by showing how emigrants influence social protests, elections, and calls for greater transparency or reform. 


*References to Kosovo shall be understood to be in the context of United Nations Security Council resolution 1244 (1999).