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IMRF Progress Declaration

 

To ensure the widest possible engagement of Member States and stakeholders in the preparatory process of the International Migration Review Forum (IMRF), the United Nations Network on Migration, on behalf of the co-facilitators of the intergovernmental consultations on the Progress Declaration, opened this dedicated discussion space on the Migration Network Hub.

To recall, the General Assembly, in its resolution A/RES/73/326, called for the Progress Declaration to be brief, concise, evidence-based and action-oriented.

The Progress Declaration may contain:

  • An evaluation of the overall progress made with respect to the implementation of the 23 objectives of the Global Compact at all levels;
  • An identification of the key challenges, opportunities and emerging issues related to the implementation of the Global Compact, and the scope for further international cooperation on international migration;
  • Recommendations on the implementation of the Global Compact, as appropriate;

Building on this guidance, the co-facilitators welcome comments and suggestions with regards to the Progress Declaration.

Comments are requested to be concise and focused on the GCM and purpose of the IMRF. Multiple submissions are accepted.

Progress Declaration

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Discussion Questions & Comments

How can we ensure the evaluation of the overall progress of the Global Compact while keeping the Progress Declaration brief and concise?

Comment pouvons-nous évaluer les progrès réalisés dans la mise en œuvre du Pacte mondial tout en gardant la Déclaration de progrès brève et concise ?

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Florence Kim 

Drawing on existing summaries of the wealth of information available (for example regional review outcomes, round table background notes, summaries of IMRF dialogues, inputs from stakeholders) can provide guidance on progress evaluation using language that is relatively concise, representative of key issues, member States and stakeholders, and covering all objectives.

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Florence Kim 

We could create a dashboard illustrating the evaluation per country as well as a ranking of the countries/ champions.

The detailed progress report could be annexed to the main report.

In reply to by Florence Kim

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What are the key challenges, opportunities and emerging issues related to the implementation of the Global Compact that you wish to see reflected in the Progress Declaration?

Quels sont les principaux défis, opportunités et problèmes émergents liés à la mise en œuvre du Pacte mondial que vous souhaitez voir reflétés dans la Déclaration de progrès?

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Florence Kim 

The global consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic have once again demonstrated the vital role migrants’ investments and remittances play for the wellbeing of hundreds of millions of families back home, who otherwise would have struggled to survive the current health and economic crisis.

Still, migrants’ economic contribution to development, in particular through the remittances they send and the investment they make, risk to remain a secondary priority in the international agenda, in the discussions at IMRF and in the progress declaration, if not sufficiently addressed and fostered.

The SDG target 10.c on remittance cost reduction by 2030 is far from being achieved. Objective 20 of the GCM provides a sound set of actionable measures but needs increased efforts to be adequately implemented.

In reply to by Florence Kim

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More can be done to promote the full inclusion of migrants. In this regard, and while acknowledging that migrants still struggle to gain access to basic services, the significant role of education is often underplayed or undocumented. States must put education at the forefront of migrant inclusion and recovery policy in order to meet the objectives of the GCM.

As States and stakeholders are encouraged to pledge concrete actions for the implementation of the Compact, ahead of the International Migration Review Forum, systematic and participatory review mechanisms should be in place to ensure that these promote the human rights of migrants, and in particular the right to quality inclusive education.

In the context of their pledges and efforts to implement the GCM, Education International urges governments to systematically assess the impact of the full/partial closur...

In reply to by Florence Kim

  • The Solidarity Center works closely with the Council of Global Unions, and is a member of a number of coalitions including the Women in Migration Network, the Global Coalition on Migration, and the Civil Society Action Committee. With these coalition partners and together with our hundreds of labor partners around the world, at this moment of drafting the Global Compact declaration, we are saying (emphatically) that it is time for coherence in migration governance.

 

  • Regular pathways must be developed hand in hand with regularization of the undocumented, climate change responses, and humanitarian needs. The labor movement is calling for a new approach to migration that centers long-term regular pathways around the human rights of migrants, breaking down the artificial separation between refugee/asylum-seekers on the one...

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Solidarity Center works closely with the Council of Global Unions, and is a member of the Women in Migration Network, Global Coalition on Migration, and the Civil Society Action Committee. With these coalition partners and together with our hundreds of labor partners around the world at this moment of drafting the Global Compact declaration, we are saying (emphatically) that it is time for coherence in migration governance. Regular pathways must be developed hand in hand with regularization of the undocumented, climate change responses, and humanitarian needs. The labor movement is calling for a new approach to migration that centers long-term regular pathways around the human rights of migrants, breaking down the artificial separation between refugee/asylum-seekers on the one hand and migrants on the other. All people on the move have rights and should...

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Florence Kim 

 

Equality of treatment is a key issue for the Progress Declaration. The COVID-19 pandemic exposed the major inequalities of treatment faced by migrant workers and members of their families caused by weaknesses in labour migration governance. To prevent a recurrence of this scenario, the Progress Declaration could call for migrants and returnees at all skills levels to be fully-integrated in the recovery with equality of treatment in law and practice, access to social protection and justice, enabling them to be both beneficiaries and agents of recovery.

read more

In reply to by Florence Kim

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One of the key challenges for migrant workers is on freely exercising their rights to join unions for collective bargaining and systemic wage theft.  The Member States of GCM must ensure that this right is fully guaranteed through enforceable policies and programmes with strong participation of trade unions as social partner.  The pervasiveness of wage theft must be mitigated. T...

In reply to by Florence Kim

 

One of the key challenges for migrant workers is on freely exercising their rights to join unions for collective bargaining and systemic wage theft.  The Member States of GCM must ensure that this right is fully guaranteed through enforceable policies and programmes with strong participation of trade unions as social partner.  The pervasiveness of wage theft must be mitigated. T...

In reply to by Florence Kim

 

One of the key challenges for migrant workers is on freely exercising their rights to join unions for collective bargaining and systemic wage theft.  The Member States of GCM must ensure that this right is fully guaranteed through enforceable policies and programmes with strong participation of trade unions as social partner.  The pervasiveness of wage theft must be mitigated. T...

In reply to by Florence Kim

Florence Kim 

The UN Secretary General’s Report names as a top priority for the IMRF “promoting inclusive societies and including migrants in COVID-19 response and recovery.”  Migrant inclusion and engagement were also named as two of the focus areas (“Migrant Agency and Voice” and “Civil Society Engagement”) in Civil Society Action Committee’s 12 Key Ways for States to Get Back on Track, a document that set forth civil society’s priorities for the IMRF. Key to achieving migrant inclusion and engagement is ens...

In reply to by Florence Kim

Florence Kim 

There are one billion people without legal identification. Objective 4 has not been implemented by many countries, not even for their own nationals.


The United Nations has supported the development of digital ID for refugees in Myanmar, for example. Why is the same type of solutions not implemented for refugees without legal identification in Latin America?

Why can only countries like Costa Rica issue 2'000 travel documents for foreigners financed by third parties so that Venezuelans with expired passports can access basic services that allow them to exercise their human rights? Why is this document or passport not offered by other countries in Latin America?

Why only Colombia was supported to create the Registry for the issuance of biometric document for Venezuelan beneficiaries of th...

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Florence Kim 

The main challenge for diaspora and migrant organisations is the recognition, visibility and support of their contribution to origin/destination countries.

Lean, efficient and swift, they constitute a network of development agents who are the first to send humanitarian assistance and who are present in fragile areas where even INGOs cannot operate anymore. Their results are sustainable as their actions rely on strategic partnerships with the local authorities and local NGOs.

Financing diaspora activities would significantly tackle the raise of poverty in Africa we see since the COVID pandemics.

However, less than 0.1% of development aid is channeled to diaspora development projects or capacity building.

The Progress declaration should highlight that no progress has been made in financing diasp...

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Florence Kim 

Dear UN Network on Migration Secretariat,

Please see in the enclosed document FAO's inputs (in track and change) to the IMRF Progress Declaration zero draft.

Respectfully,

Ion Bulgac, Rural Migration Specialist, FAO

In reply to by Florence Kim

What are your recommendations on the scope for further international cooperation on international migration?

Quelles sont vos recommandations sur la portée d'une coopération internationale plus poussée en matière de migration internationale?

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Florence Kim 

Member States should develop and implement bilateral labour migration agreements and regional freedom of movement agreements grounded in international labour standards and human rights, developed based on social dialogue

States should develop bilateral, regional and multi-regional social protection agreements to ensure social protection for all migrant workers, regardless of status, in line with relevant international labour standards

States should engage with and deepen dialogue cooperation with employers’ and workers’ organizations as well as recruitment agencies along migration corridors to enable coordinated action to ensure fair recruitment and decent work for migrant workers, especially ensuring zero-cost recruitment

States and stakeholders, especially the private sector and...

In reply to by Florence Kim

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How can we ensure that the Progress Declaration will be evidence-based and action-oriented?

Comment pouvons-nous garantir que la Déclaration de progrès soit fondée sur des preuves et orientée vers l'action ?

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Florence Kim 

There is a significant body of evidence that can be drawn from through the following sources:

  • Regional review outcomes
  • Voluntary national reviews
  • The Secretary-General’s Report

In reply to by Florence Kim

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How can we effectively assess the further implementation of the Global Compact?

Comment pouvons-nous évaluer efficacement la poursuite de la mise en œuvre du Pacte mondial ?

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Florence Kim in anything we doing in life, if we involve the affected people is always gonna be possible and easy to find solutions I believe, let's involve and invite migrants, survivors, victims etc in Platforms like this, people like me i do my best to get this Platforms so that i will be participating and involve myself so that i can help others by telling my story as a victim/survivor of human trafficking, all we need is to be involve so that we can help in the work

 

Thanks

In reply to by Florence Kim

Florence Kim 

The GCM preamble confirms that the Compact rests squarely on human rights principles and highlights the importance of safeguarding the rights of all migrants, regardless of migration status. However, neither the GCM nor UN General Assembly (UNGA) Resolution 73/326, which set forth the format and the organizational aspects of the IMRF, specifies how State implementation will be evaluated for human rights compliance. By emphasizing only “that the Global Compact is to be implemented in a matter that is consistent with our rights and obligations under international law”, the GCM appears to leave open for interpretation the methods by which its objectives are to be realized. This leeway could empower States to pursue GCM objectives through actions that restrict migrant rights and civic space.

The GCM lists supportive action...

In reply to by Florence Kim

Florence Kim 

An inclusive system of monitoring of progress could be developed, engaging all stakeholders and the UN system through the Network at global, regional and national levels, drawing on existing indicators and voluntary reporting of key initiatives by States. The process of reporting could be centralized on the migration network hub.

Potential means of assessment include:

  • Strengthened monitoring of migration-related SDG indicators (e.g. SDG indicators 8.8.1, 8.8.2, 10.7.1 etc)
  • Status of ratifications of key international labour standards related to migration
  • Number of bilateral and multilateral labour migration agreements based on UN System guidance entered into

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Florence Kim 

We need to assess against targets, so we need to define targets/ progress indicators for each of the 23 goals

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Florence Kim 

We need to assess against targets, so we need to define targets/ progress indicators for each of the 23 goals

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Unless and until the people affected are invited and involve to be part of the work and we all make them believe and know that they are part of us untill then, the work will be done as we wish it to be. We feel not involve in the work of migration, we are Survivors, VICTIMS etc we should be involve so that our voices should be heard, we want to decide on our own and be part of the laws they writing for us, we want to be involved in anything concerning migration

Thanks

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  • The Solidarity Center works closely with the Council of Global Unions, and is a member of a number of coalitions including the Women in Migration Network, the Global Coalition on Migration, and the Civil Society Action Committee. With these coalition partners and together with our hundreds of labor partners around the world, at this moment of drafting the Global Compact declaration, we are saying (emphatically) that it is time for coherence in migration governance.
  • Regular pathways must be developed hand in hand with regularization of the undocumented, climate change responses, and humanitarian needs. The labor movement is calling for a new approach to migration that centers long-term regular pathways around the human rights of migrants, breaking down the artificial separation between refugee/asylum-seekers on the one hand, and migrants on the other...

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Statement from UNODC

This is a statement from the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) providing suggestions on thematic priorities to be considered for the IMRF Progress Declaration.

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UNCTAD inputs to the Progress Declaration

The implementation of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) calls for enhanced international cooperation. Further collaboration, in turn, will benefit from intensified recognition of the mutually reinforcing role of the GCM and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

read more

The Civil Society Action Committee submits the "12 Key Ways Paper" as a joint contribution highlighting global civil society priorities towards the IMRF Progress Declaration.

The Secretary General’s report names as a top priority for the IMRF “promoting inclusive societies and including migrants in COVID-19 response and recovery.”  Migrant inclusion and engagement were also named as 2 of the 12 focus areas in CS Action Committee’s 12 Key Ways for States to Get Back on Track. Key to achieving migrant inclusion is ensuring the full participation of migrants and migrant-allied civil society in the policies that shape migrant lives. Migrant groups' participation in turn rests on their ability to freely exercise their rights to ...

The Spotlight Report on Global Migration https://spotlightreportmigration.org/ focus on key issues affecting migrants at the grassroots, national and regional levels. The publication brings grassroots organizations, activists and communities’ voices to the forefront in speaking to decision-makers at the policy-level. Please find our list of recommendations here.

The report is a joint effort by the Global Coalition on Migration (GCM) and the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES) and it will be published on April 28, 2022.

PICUM's input to the co-facilitators of the IMRF ahead of the Zero Draft on the Progress Declaration focuses on undocumented migrants’ access to services (including health care); access to justice; and regularisation, with examples from Europe of governmental practices in these areas.

March 2022 

Please see attached remarks from the Virtual Townhall on behalf of the NGO Committee on Migration and Mercy International Association.

One of the key challenges for migrant workers is on freely exercising their rights to join unions for collective bargaining and systemic wage theft.  The Member States of GCM must ensure that this right is fully guaranteed through enforceable policies and programmes with strong participation of trade unions as social partner.  The pervasiveness of wage theft must be mitigated. This calls on for New Social Contract.

 While business is steadily rebounding, businesses should not continue the old ways on stepping on the backs of workers who are still struggling with the impact of the pandemic.

  1. Work towards the creation of a New Social Contract for Migrant Workers between governments, workers and employers. This New Social Contract should include a universal guarantee for all workers, regardless...

Intervention UNCTAD second townhall consultation, 25 March 2022

Thank you both very much for the comprehensive zero draft of the Progress Declaration, to be adopted at the IMRF.

The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, UNCTAD, a member of the United Nations Network on Migration. is a development organization and is happy to acknowledge how the draft of the Progress Declaration brings to the limelight the important connections between the Global Compact and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The recognition of the mutual reinforcing role of both agendas can potentiate further multi-stakeholder collaboration and international cooperation, as called for in the context of the implementation of the Global Compact.

Our two small suggestions to the text aim to further highlight the synergies between migration a...

Please find attached the remarks on behalf of ADEPT concerning African diaspora/migrants, discussed on the first (7 March) and second (25 March) virtual townhall. Thank you !

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Labour’s Position on the 2022 International Migration Review Forum Progress Declaration
On behalf of the Council of Global Unions Migration Working Group, I am submitting our position on IMRF Zero Draft Progress Declaration.  We have also articulated the same demands in our participation in the two previous virtual town hall meetings. 

Our key demands:

  • Collective worker voice and participation.
  • Commitment to decent work, quality public services and sustainable development.  
  • Non-discrimination mandates.  
  • Diverse channels for regular migration.  
  • Just models for labour migration and adherence to international standards.
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PICUM's Comments (29 March 2022) on the Zero Draft of the International Migration Review Forum Progress Declaration focus on:

  • Best interests of the child;
  • Migrant smuggling and humanitarian assistance;
  • Simplification of procedures and modernisation of border crossing points;
  • Implementing community-based solutions and working towards ending detention;
  • Access to services.

Secours Catholique-Caritas France submits its written inputs on the Zero Draft of the Progress Declaration of the 2022 International Migration Review Forum, with concrete recommendations for strengthening the topic of safe pathways for regular migration in the context of climate change and environmental degradation.

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AFFORD would like to make a suggestion for an addition to the comprehensive zero draft of the Progress Declaration, especially as it relates to obj 19, and to paragraph 32, pasted below: 

"32. Progress was achieved in the provision of health and psychological assistance to those impacted by the pandemic through efforts of diaspora networks and communities that set up humanitarian initiatives and digital platforms. Progress was also made in the recognition of the role of diaspora engagement and remittances in national development strategies, and in programmes that are being undertaken to improve financial inclusion and the literacy of foreign workers and their families. Several Member States concluded and implemented bilateral or multilateral agreements to foster the portability of social security entitlements." 

While we recognise that some ...

Public Services International (PSIComments on the IMRF Progress Declaration Zero Draft

Delivered during the Co-facilitators' second virtual townhall briefing with stakeholders and UN entities

25 March 2022

It is important to set the progress declaration in the context of lessons we learned from the pandemic crisis, but also bearing in mind that we also have the equally urgent climate crisis and the ongoing conflicts not just in Europe but in many parts of the developing world  – all of which require our attention and response as we deal with the root causes and structural drivers of migration.

Anchored on the cross-cutting and interdependent guiding principles and working on the 23 principal objectives of the GCM, we must advance our progress in the GCM by not just returning to nor...

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Act Alliance, the Climate Migration and Displacement Platform (CMDP), the Civil Society Action Committee, the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) and Secours Catholique-Caritas France, supported by the Platform on Disaster Displacement (PDD), submit written inputs to inform the Zero Draft of the Progress Declaration of the 2022 International Migration Review Forum. 

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This is Education International's input on the zero draft of the Progress Declaration. Education International (EI) is the Global Union Federation that represents organisations of teachers and other education workers. EI is the largest sectoral organisation of unions with more than 32 million teachers and education service professionals in 383 organisations in 178 countries and territories. Education is a member of the Council of Global Unions representing more than 200 million workers globally, including migrant workers. EI's input focuses on the need for a major focus on education, labour migration and social dialogue.

In addition to the detailed input to the Zero Draft of the IMRF Progress Declaration already shared with the co-facilitators, please find attached overall key messages for the IMRF prepared by the Secretariat of the Platform on Disaster Displacement (PDD) as part of the PDD's Steering Group Working Group on Human Mobility.

Initiative for Child Rights in the Global Compacts written input on the Zero draft of the IMRF Progress Declaration

With thanks for the comprehensive zero draft of the IMRF Progress Declaration and the opportunity to make a contribution, the multi-stakeholder Initiative for Child Rights in the Global Compacts is happy to share the attached input and recommendations which we hope can be useful in considering progress of the GCM implementation for children. 

Initiative for Child Rights in the Global Compacts' input on the Zero Draft of the IMRF Progress Declaration

With thanks for the comprehensive zero draft of the IMRF Progress Declaration and the opportunity to contribute, the multi-stakeholder Initiative for Child Rights in the Global Compacts is happy to share the attached input and recommendations which we hope will be useful in reviewing progress of GCM implementation for children. 

Adjunto encontrarán aportes de CODHES,Colombia,  a la Declaración de Progreso -borrador cero, después de la segunda sesión informativa virtual con partes interesadas y Agencias de la ONU el día 25 de marzo de 2022

Hi,

In addition to the remarks from the virtual townhall meeting, My World Mexico team would also like to submit the following comments for your consideration in the IMRF Declaration Progress.

Thank you for your attention,

QUNO (Quakers) Comments on the Zero Draft

We thank the co-facilitators for making this space available to submit written comments and for the opportunities to engage through the open, virtual townhall meetings immediately before or after each round of negotiations to enable them to hear from a broad range of stakeholders. We hope the expertise, experience and perspectives shared on this discussion space and in the townhall meetings will be a useful and valuable part of the development of the Progress Declaration.

We thank the co-facilitators for this draft and are pleased to see some of our key concerns reflected, we look forward to working towards an ambitious, effective and human rights based progress declaration.

In addition to the comments contained in this document specific language proposals are available on request: 

Laurel Townhead, Representative, Human Rights and Refugees

ltownhead@quno.ch

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Please see the Migration Youth & Children Platform's inputs into the zero draft of the Progress Declaration, which suggests specific language focused on youth and children, and supporting the inputs of the Civil Society Action Committee and members. 

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The Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) appreciates that REV 1 draft responds to many of the comments provided to the Zero Draft.

To further advance an ambitious and human rights-based Progress Declaration, we would recommend the following:

  • Adopt a more explicitly people-centred and human rights-based approach. In several places we have encouraged language which more explicitly adopts a people-centred approach. While the document notes well the positive contributions of migrants to countries of origin, transit and destination, it would be important to reinforce the perspective of migrants as human beings and as rights-holders, regardless of their contributions.
  • Consider how to better incorporate and mainstream the GCM guiding principles throughout the text. We...

In reply to by Florence Kim

Florence Kim 

CELS (Centro de Estudios Legales y Sociales) Comments on the REV 1 Draft

We thank the co-facilitators for making this space available to submit written comments. We hope that the contributions submitted here will help to working towards an ambitious, effective and human rights based progress declaration.

Thank you

In reply to by Florence Kim

Florence Kim 

Hereby, FAO submits the inputs/suggestions to the REV1 Draft of the Progress Declaration and we remain hopeful that our contribution will be taken on board and ultimately enrich the text of the declaration with the agriculture, rural development and food security considerations.

Kind regards,

Ion Bulgac,

Rural Migration Specialist, Decent Rural Employment Team, Inclusive Rural Transformation and Gender Equality Division (ESP), Economic and Social Development Stream

In reply to by Florence Kim

Migrant Forum in Asia (MFA) is sharing its written inputs on the issue of wage theft to the first revision of the Progress Declaration that was also raised during yesterday's third Townhall meeting.

 

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Save the Children appreciate the significant efforts and provision in Rev1 of the declaration and the increase of recognition of the rights of children in migration in this version. And we welcome the inclusion of Paras 9ter and 42bis as well as increased references to children throughout the document. 

in the spirit of collaboration and our common ambition to accelerate the implementation of the GCM in line with its guiding principle of child sensitiveness and the best interests of children,  in the below comments, we would like to highlight and recognise the parts of the document where children are more visible and offer recommendations to ensure children are at the heart of a declaration that fully reflects the child-focussed spirit of the GGM.

Please find our full recommendations of text in the attached file. 

In reply to by Florence Kim

Save the Children appreciate the significant efforts and provisions in Rev 1 of the declaration and the increased recognition of the rights of children in migration in this version. In our previous comments, we recommended the inclusion of specific paragraphs on children, and we welcome the inclusion of paras 9ter and 42bis as well as increased references to children throughout the document.

In the spirit of collaboration and our common ambition to accelerate the implementation of the GCM in line with its guiding principle of child sensitiveness and the best interests of children,  in the below comments, we would like to highlight and recognise the parts of the document where children are more visible and offer recommendations to ensure children are at the heart of a declaration that fully reflects the child-focussed spirit of the GGM.

Please find Save the Chi...

In reply to by Florence Kim

PICUM's submission (8 April 2022) on Rev 1 of the Zero Draft of the Progress Declaration concerns the following areas:

- Children in migration
- Detention
- Migrant smuggling and return
- Racism
- Labor rights, regular pathways, and regularisation
- Access to services

In reply to by Florence Kim

AFFORD - comments to Rev 1.

We thank the co-facilitators for making multiple spaces available for submitting comments.  Please find the attached submission for wording as it relates to the inclusion of 'diaspora' in the IMRF Progress Declaration Rev 1. 

Thank you

In reply to by Florence Kim

Proposal: add the following paragraph to the Progress Declaration:
 

56 a. We request the Secretary General to examine the possibility of preparing a global conference to negotiate  a global legal framework instrument to facilitate the procedural and administrative aspects of cooperation regarding temporary labor migration movements.

This suggestion follows up on the final Article (22) of the Resolution on Mass Migration adopted by the Institut de Droit International (https://www.idi-iil.org/en/) at its 2017 Hyderabad session, which calls on States "to negotiate a basic legal instrument, of a universal character, governing direct cooperation between States of Origin and Host States of mass migration flaws, including temporary migratory flows".

The attachment sets out the proposal in more d...

In reply to by Florence Kim

Correction to my previous comment. I sent you as an attachment an earlier version of my proposal. Please ignore it and refer only to the attached file

Apologies, thank you very much  Hans van Loon  

In reply to by Florence Kim

We thank the co-facilitators for advancing on the Progress Declaration and in particular for the quick turnaround in producing a revised version.

Please find attached further written input on the REV 1 Draft by the Envoy of the Chair of the PDD and the PDD Secretariat.

In reply to by Florence Kim

The Building and Wood Workers' International hereby endorses and respectfully shares the input on the issue of wage theft to the first revision of the Progress Declaration, as part of the Justice for Wage Theft Campaign.

In reply to by Florence Kim

Florence Kim 

Hello Ms. Florence Kim: 

Following my suggestions made verbally in the townhall meeting on 6th April to the Co-facilitators Amb Maes and Amb Fatima, here is my written submission on Rev 1 of the Progress Declaration:

1. Please add the third and the most important dimension of the mission approach at hand - the "Whole of Migrant" approach (implying all types and kinds of migrants are included) to the "Whole of Government" approach and the "Whole of Society" approach. This would also make the overall approach of IMRF a truly balanced one, ensuring that none of the people on the move - the diaspora, the refugees (despite there being the GCR), the trafficked, the smuggled, the white collar workers right up to the STEM professionals, the blue-collar workers, the minors (both accompanied and un...

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Please share your comments and questions on Rev 2 by clicking on the "reply" button.

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The Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) appreciates the continued commitment to ensuring the Progress Declaration enhances and builds upon the existing GCM commitments.

Enclosed you will find, for your consideration, OHCHR's comments to the REV 2 of the GCM Progress Declaration. In these, we have focused primarily on ensuring the Progress Declaration upholds the GCM's commitment to the principle of non-regression while also seeking to strengthen the important final section on recommendations to accelerate GCM implementation.

We remain available to provide technical advice on any of the human rights-related elements of the Progress Declaration.

In reply to by Florence Kim

UNICEF thanks the Co-facilitators for Rev2 of this document, with many amendments in this version that we have welcomed in the attached. Please find attached UNICEF's comments and proposals with regards to Rev2 of the Progress Declaration.

Best regards,

Melanie Teff - UNICEF

In reply to by Florence Kim

Please find attached below the language proposal submission for REV2 of the Climate, Migration, and Displacement Platform, a global coalition of more than 30 organizations and individuals working at the intersection of climate change, migration, and displacement.

You will note that we focus our recommendations on paras 10, 21, 23, and several of the 43s.

Apologies for the delay in submission to this discussion space.

In reply to by Florence Kim

UN Women would like to thank the Co-facilitators for the opportunity to provide inputs to Rev 2. Our contributions focus on further strengthening the inclusion of gender equality considerations in line with the guiding principle of gender-responsiveness. 

In reply to by Florence Kim

PICUM’s comments (22 April 2022) on Rev 2 of the Progress Declaration, cover the following areas:

  • Children in migration
  • Women
  • Immigration detention
  • Migrant smuggling
  • Return policies
  • Access to services
  • Racism
  • Labor rights

 

In reply to by Florence Kim

 

Please find attached a few inputs with regards to Rev2 of the Progress Declaration from the UN World Food Programme, with language suggested for paragraphs 23, 33 and 42-ter.

Best regards,

Cristina Benvenuti – WFP Geneva Global Office

In reply to by Florence Kim

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As a member of ECOSOC and co-chair of the Bangladesh United Nations Network on Migration (BDUNNM) technical working group, Institute of Informatics and Development (IID) has always strived to bring the voice of civil society to the global arena. 

IID extends appreciation as the Progress Declaration ensures continued development based on the multiple rounds of comments and feedback.

Enclosed you will find IID's recommendations on the REV2 of the Progress Declaration

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Dear colleagues,

With many thanks to the co-facilitators and their teams for the excellent work on Rev 3, UNHCR would like to submit 2 additional suggestions in relation to the distinction between migrants and refugees (in line with para. 4 of the GCM) and to strengthen the para on migrants rescued at sea.

With many thanks for your kind consideration.

In reply to by Florence Kim

Please share your comments and questions on Rev. 3 by clicking on the "reply" button

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Many thanks for sharing this third draft. Please find attached a few inputs from the UN World Food Programme, with language suggested for paragraphs 23, 33 and 42-ter.

Best regards,

Cristina Benvenuti – WFP Geneva Global Office

In reply to by Florence Kim

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Attached find Women in Migration Network's comments on Rev 3, which echoes language of many civil society colleagues. We outline our most urgent points for negotiations, and then offer line by line commentary as well. See those priority concerns in this email as well. 1. Create a separate paragraph (9 pre) specifically addressing the realities of migrant women. There are paragraphs addressing race and children’s concerns, but not one addressing migrant women, not all of whom are remunerated workers. Our proposed language references internationally agreed language as noted below. 9pre. We recognize the specific contributions and experiences of women migrants and the need to redouble efforts to ensure a gender perspective throughout the whole of migration and its governance, and to realise the empowerment of all women and girls, respecting and protecting their rights, and a...

In reply to by Cristina Benvenuti

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Florence Kim 

As set forth in the UN Secretary General’s report (UN Doc. No. A/76/642, sec. III(A)) and in the Civil Society Action Committee’s 12 Key Ways document, ensuring migrant inclusion and participation in the decision-making that affects them should be a priority for the IMRF because it is a crucial ingredient in ensuring safe, orderly and regular migration. The successful pursuit of GCM objectives requires migrant perspectives, which will be impossible to obtain if migrants are not invited to participate in the development, delivery, and review of policy.

Rev.1 and Rev. 2 of the Progress Declaration included strong recommendations that States commit to ensuring migrants’ right to participate in ...

In reply to by Florence Kim

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