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Youth Innovation Challenge for Human Mobility

GCM Objectives

GCM Guiding Principles*

*All practices are to uphold the ten guiding principles of the GCM. This practice particularly exemplifies these listed principles.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Dates

2021 - Present

Type of practice

Project/Programme

Geographic Scope

Regions:

Summary

UNDP’s human mobility and youth teams at the Bangkok Regional Hub joined forces with IOM, UN-Habitat, MFA and APRRN to support young people across the Asia-Pacific in developing social entrepreneurial solutions benefitting migrants, displaced people and host communities among the urban poor. The innovation challenge is part of a human mobility programme that pursues area-based interventions in contexts of broad marginalization and exclusion with high numbers of mobile populations. 

Thematic priorities were jobs and income; social cohesion; climate change and disasters; and essential services. Demonstrating the involvement of target populations – i.e., migrants, displaced people and/or host communities – as participants in project design was a criterion in the application and selection process. Of the 150 applications obtained, 39 teams with promising solutions, more than half of which were women-led, received support to develop their ideas into sustainable social enterprises through a training, mentorship and incubation programme. At the end, the teams pitched their solutions to an independent jury, with the 5 winning teams receiving financial resources and further mentorship for prototyping. Others were granted access to an online repository of courses relevant to social entrepreneurship. The winning teams work with refugees (India and Indonesia); stateless people (Malaysia); and broader urban poor populations (Bangladesh and Philippines).

Collaborators

Main Implementer

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Other Organizations

UNDP

Partners

International Organization for Migration - IOM
United Nations Human Settlements Programme - UN-Habitat
Migrant Forum Asia - MFA
Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network - APRRN

Benefit and Impact

The key impact of the initiative has been a) enhanced capacities and networks of social entrepreneurs who received mentorship and financial support, and b) improved well-being of migrants, displaced people and marginalised host communities in the communities where the social entrepreneurs operate.

The 39 participating teams have demonstrated that they are now better equipped to pursue social enterprise pathways in general, and those that benefit mobile populations specifically. They:
- are more aware of social and environmental issues and how they can contribute to the SDGs through social enterprises;
- have a deeper appreciation of the concept of social entrepreneurship;
- have a stronger understanding of how human-centered design can be used to address social and/or environmental issues; and
- have developed their solutions further to the specific challenges faced by diverse mobile populations and marginalized host communities.

The 5 winning teams have received funding and additional mentorship support to prototype their solutions. These are:
- Borneo Komrad, which invests the profits from marketing and selling dried fish products into providing educational opportunities for stateless children in Malaysia;
- Peacebuilding Project, which produces reusable sanitary napkins to generate income and menstrual health support for refugee women in India;
- Project Kanlong, which provides micro-mobile housing units for urban poor populations with access to services and livelihoods in the Philippines;
- Garbageman, which integrates waste handlers and scrap dealers into a formalized supply chain for waste management in Bangladesh; and
- Liberty Society, which empowers refugee women through a training-to-employment model as part of its sustainable fashion enterprise in Indonesia.

Key Lessons

The initiative has shown that there is a remarkable level of social and entrepreneurial spirit among young people in the Asia-Pacific region, who seek to make a difference through creativity and innovation in the lives of migrants, displaced people and marginalized host communities in urban contexts. Further support is needed to help them take their initiatives from ideas to sustainable social enterprises through relevant trainings, financing, access to support networks and mentorship.

Recommendations(if the practice is to be replicated)

It is important to engage civil society organizations and other stakeholders with local networks and on-the-ground presence in the initiative to ensure the understanding and buy-in from relevant communities, but also for social entrepreneurial initiatives to be adequately contextualized to the conditions and needs of the areas where they operate.

Innovation

The initiative has been innovative for several reasons, including:
a) Because it applied a proven methodology of UNDP’s Youth Co:Lab process to the human mobility context in Asia-Pacific, resulting in the first-ever youth innovation challenge specifically targeted at mobile and host populations in the region;
b) Because it provided integrated eco-system support to young social entrepreneurs, from functional trainings in business management to thematic support related to human mobility, along with networking opportunities, access to funding and ongoing mentorship, which jointly greatly increased their chances of long-term success.

Media

Meet Borneo Komrad - Creating impact for stateless children and communities (Malaysia)

Date submitted:

21 March 2022

Disclaimer: The content of this practice reflects the views of the implementers and does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations, the United Nations Network on Migration, and its members.

 

 

Youth Innovation Challenge for Human Mobility

GCM Objectives

Dates:

2021 - Present

Type of practice:

Project/Programme

Geographic Scope

Regions:

Summary

UNDP’s human mobility and youth teams at the Bangkok Regional Hub joined forces with IOM, UN-Habitat, MFA and APRRN to support young people across the Asia-Pacific in developing social entrepreneurial solutions benefitting migrants, displaced people and host communities among the urban poor. The innovation challenge is part of a human mobility programme that pursues area-based interventions in contexts of broad marginalization and exclusion with high numbers of mobile populations. 

Thematic priorities were jobs and income; social cohesion; climate change and disasters; and essential services. Demonstrating the involvement of target populations – i.e., migrants, displaced people and/or host communities – as participants in project design was a criterion in the application and selection process. Of the 150 applications obtained, 39 teams with promising solutions, more than half of which were women-led, received support to develop their ideas into sustainable social enterprises through a training, mentorship and incubation programme. At the end, the teams pitched their solutions to an independent jury, with the 5 winning teams receiving financial resources and further mentorship for prototyping. Others were granted access to an online repository of courses relevant to social entrepreneurship. The winning teams work with refugees (India and Indonesia); stateless people (Malaysia); and broader urban poor populations (Bangladesh and Philippines).

Collaborators

Main Implementer:

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Other Organizations:

UNDP

Partners:

International Organization for Migration - IOM
United Nations Human Settlements Programme - UN-Habitat
Migrant Forum Asia - MFA
Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network - APRRN

Benefit and Impact

The key impact of the initiative has been a) enhanced capacities and networks of social entrepreneurs who received mentorship and financial support, and b) improved well-being of migrants, displaced people and marginalised host communities in the communities where the social entrepreneurs operate.

The 39 participating teams have demonstrated that they are now better equipped to pursue social enterprise pathways in general, and those that benefit mobile populations specifically. They:
- are more aware of social and environmental issues and how they can contribute to the SDGs through social enterprises;
- have a deeper appreciation of the concept of social entrepreneurship;
- have a stronger understanding of how human-centered design can be used to address social and/or environmental issues; and
- have developed their solutions further to the specific challenges faced by diverse mobile populations and marginalized host communities.

The 5 winning teams have received funding and additional mentorship support to prototype their solutions. These are:
- Borneo Komrad, which invests the profits from marketing and selling dried fish products into providing educational opportunities for stateless children in Malaysia;
- Peacebuilding Project, which produces reusable sanitary napkins to generate income and menstrual health support for refugee women in India;
- Project Kanlong, which provides micro-mobile housing units for urban poor populations with access to services and livelihoods in the Philippines;
- Garbageman, which integrates waste handlers and scrap dealers into a formalized supply chain for waste management in Bangladesh; and
- Liberty Society, which empowers refugee women through a training-to-employment model as part of its sustainable fashion enterprise in Indonesia.

Key Lessons

The initiative has shown that there is a remarkable level of social and entrepreneurial spirit among young people in the Asia-Pacific region, who seek to make a difference through creativity and innovation in the lives of migrants, displaced people and marginalized host communities in urban contexts. Further support is needed to help them take their initiatives from ideas to sustainable social enterprises through relevant trainings, financing, access to support networks and mentorship.

Recommendations(if the practice is to be replicated)

It is important to engage civil society organizations and other stakeholders with local networks and on-the-ground presence in the initiative to ensure the understanding and buy-in from relevant communities, but also for social entrepreneurial initiatives to be adequately contextualized to the conditions and needs of the areas where they operate.

Meet Borneo Komrad - Creating impact for stateless children and communities (Malaysia)

GCM Guiding Principles*

*All practices are to uphold the ten guiding principles of the GCM. This practice particularly exemplifies these listed principles.

Innovation

The initiative has been innovative for several reasons, including:
a) Because it applied a proven methodology of UNDP’s Youth Co:Lab process to the human mobility context in Asia-Pacific, resulting in the first-ever youth innovation challenge specifically targeted at mobile and host populations in the region;
b) Because it provided integrated eco-system support to young social entrepreneurs, from functional trainings in business management to thematic support related to human mobility, along with networking opportunities, access to funding and ongoing mentorship, which jointly greatly increased their chances of long-term success.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Date submitted:

21 March 2022

Disclaimer: The content of this practice reflects the views of the implementers and does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations, the United Nations Network on Migration, and its members.

 

 

*References to Kosovo shall be understood to be in the context of United Nations Security Council resolution 1244 (1999).