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Coordinated Management of the DTM at the Chilean-Bolivian border

GCM Objectives

GCM Guiding Principles*

*All practices are to uphold the ten guiding principles of the GCM. This practice particularly exemplifies these listed principles.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Dates

2022 - Present

Type of practice

Measuring/Data collection

Latest content

Regions:

Sub Regions:

Local:

Colchane, Republic of Chile, Pisiga, Plurinational State of Bolivia

Summary

Migration flows along the Bolivia-Chile border presented changing patterns in terms of movement schedules, entry points, and diverse control measures enforced by Chilean authorities. This complexity delayed the ability to conduct comprehensive and effective data collection exercises using IOM¨s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM). This is why IOM Chile and Bolivia started to work together to address this challenge. To optimize resource utilization and respond effectively to the dynamics at the Chilean-Bolivian (Colchane-Pisiga) border while fulfilling the information generation requirement, a strategy was developed for a comprehensive DTM coverage, particularly targeting areas with high mobility. Initially, surveys were solely conducted among individuals at the reception center on the Chilean side, missing information of a significant portion of the population migrating or in transit. The strategy was designed to involve personnel from both sides of the border. This way, the DTM teams from IOM Bolivia and IOM Chile began a joint border analysis work since May 2022. During the initial count at formal terminals, over 400 individuals were counted. Subsequently, this type of counting was conducted monthly, and later, on a weekly basis. The collected information led to the development of a dynamic, publicly accessible dashboard, enabling the visualization of the data cycle, updated with each weekly count. Link to dashboard: https://app.powerbi.com/view?r=eyJrIjoiNmQ0NDVmNTItNTc4OS00NTYzLTg0YzMt… Since June 2023, characterizations began to be included in the count once a month using a concise questionnaire. Simultaneously, additional survey points were identified. Characterization reports are generated every two months. Considering that there are several borders with a high flow of people and complex geography, this methodology is easily replicable in those similar circumstances.

When carrying out the DTM Flow Monitoring Registry, information is obtained by observing and asking about nationality. However, no personal or contact data is collected. No personal data such as names and contact details are collected. When giving informed consent, it is explained that the information is completely anonymous and voluntary.  

Additionally, there are questions about the person's sex but there are no questions related to their gender. This was determined by the dynamics of the border survey, most of the surveys are given in open spaces, so it is sought to reduce questions that may put the person at risk. However, in the reports the results where the crossing data by sex shows significant differences is highlighted. The person responding the survey is also asked general questions about the children under their care, this is to get a basic profile of the children (age, sex, documentation they have and education access in the last year).  At this point, the tool is being improved based on the experience of the surveyors. In addition, two Venezuelan surveyors are part of the team, which has allowed for a better perspective on the questions and their phrasing. 

Organizations

Partner/Donor Organizations

Government of the United States - Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

Benefit and Impact

IOM Chile and IOM Bolivia combined efforts to enhance data collection. Without this kind of partnership and collaborative work, obtaining such valuable information would not have been possible. Additionally, the partnership helped in cost-sharing.
Thanks to the efficiency of this practice, counts began to take place more frequently, enabling the generation of a total of 43 reports in a year and a half of implementation. These reports have become an invaluable resource for strengthening the regional DTM plan and the Response Plan for Venezuelan Refugees and Migrants (RMRP).
Furthermore, public presentations of the results have had significant impact among high-level Chilean government officials. In the case of Bolivia, the data generated contributes to planning processes for partners within the Response for the Venezuela situation (R4V) platform, engaging with governmental bodies on managing and providing assistance and protection in migration matters.

Key Lessons

-It was necessary to adapt the surveys into shorter documents in order to gather more responses. This adaptation took into consideration feedback from surveyors.
-Teams of surveyors from nearby cities in Bolivia had to be organized to travel and conduct field surveys. This strategy allowed the consolidation of resources to carry out both the counting and surveys in a single trip

Recommendations(if the practice is to be replicated)

-Taking into account the suggestions of surveyors when designing or modifying surveys is crucial. At times, it is better to conduct shorter surveys with essential information to gather more responses, than having less responses with more information.
-It is recommended to take into account information from administrative data and the beneficiary records of IOM to strengthen the context of the border. Particularly, information regarding figures of attention from agencies providing assistance and the government institutions present in the area.
-Conducting pilot exercises focused on the community is highly important. Actions involving participation and feedback from migrant communities were implemented throughout the process.

Innovation

This kind of joint management represents an innovative response to the challenges arising in border areas with high volumes of people and complex geography. The methodology employed allows the distribution of capacities, teams, and resources efficiently, adapting to the geography by utilizing access points where collecting information is easier. In addition, the analysis of the tools to be implemented was collaborative, allowing a broader and comprehensive study of the information.

Date submitted:

18 January 2024

Disclaimer: The content of this practice reflects the views of the implementers and does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations, the United Nations Network on Migration, and its members.

 

 

Coordinated Management of the DTM at the Chilean-Bolivian border

GCM Objectives

Dates:

2022 - Present

Type of practice:

Measuring/Data collection

Latest content

Regions:

Sub Regions:

Local:

Colchane, Republic of Chile, Pisiga, Plurinational State of Bolivia

Summary

Migration flows along the Bolivia-Chile border presented changing patterns in terms of movement schedules, entry points, and diverse control measures enforced by Chilean authorities. This complexity delayed the ability to conduct comprehensive and effective data collection exercises using IOM¨s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM). This is why IOM Chile and Bolivia started to work together to address this challenge. To optimize resource utilization and respond effectively to the dynamics at the Chilean-Bolivian (Colchane-Pisiga) border while fulfilling the information generation requirement, a strategy was developed for a comprehensive DTM coverage, particularly targeting areas with high mobility. Initially, surveys were solely conducted among individuals at the reception center on the Chilean side, missing information of a significant portion of the population migrating or in transit. The strategy was designed to involve personnel from both sides of the border. This way, the DTM teams from IOM Bolivia and IOM Chile began a joint border analysis work since May 2022. During the initial count at formal terminals, over 400 individuals were counted. Subsequently, this type of counting was conducted monthly, and later, on a weekly basis. The collected information led to the development of a dynamic, publicly accessible dashboard, enabling the visualization of the data cycle, updated with each weekly count. Link to dashboard: https://app.powerbi.com/view?r=eyJrIjoiNmQ0NDVmNTItNTc4OS00NTYzLTg0YzMt… Since June 2023, characterizations began to be included in the count once a month using a concise questionnaire. Simultaneously, additional survey points were identified. Characterization reports are generated every two months. Considering that there are several borders with a high flow of people and complex geography, this methodology is easily replicable in those similar circumstances.

When carrying out the DTM Flow Monitoring Registry, information is obtained by observing and asking about nationality. However, no personal or contact data is collected. No personal data such as names and contact details are collected. When giving informed consent, it is explained that the information is completely anonymous and voluntary.  

Additionally, there are questions about the person's sex but there are no questions related to their gender. This was determined by the dynamics of the border survey, most of the surveys are given in open spaces, so it is sought to reduce questions that may put the person at risk. However, in the reports the results where the crossing data by sex shows significant differences is highlighted. The person responding the survey is also asked general questions about the children under their care, this is to get a basic profile of the children (age, sex, documentation they have and education access in the last year).  At this point, the tool is being improved based on the experience of the surveyors. In addition, two Venezuelan surveyors are part of the team, which has allowed for a better perspective on the questions and their phrasing. 

Organizations

Partner/Donor Organizations:

Government of the United States - Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

Benefit and Impact

IOM Chile and IOM Bolivia combined efforts to enhance data collection. Without this kind of partnership and collaborative work, obtaining such valuable information would not have been possible. Additionally, the partnership helped in cost-sharing.
Thanks to the efficiency of this practice, counts began to take place more frequently, enabling the generation of a total of 43 reports in a year and a half of implementation. These reports have become an invaluable resource for strengthening the regional DTM plan and the Response Plan for Venezuelan Refugees and Migrants (RMRP).
Furthermore, public presentations of the results have had significant impact among high-level Chilean government officials. In the case of Bolivia, the data generated contributes to planning processes for partners within the Response for the Venezuela situation (R4V) platform, engaging with governmental bodies on managing and providing assistance and protection in migration matters.

Key Lessons

-It was necessary to adapt the surveys into shorter documents in order to gather more responses. This adaptation took into consideration feedback from surveyors.
-Teams of surveyors from nearby cities in Bolivia had to be organized to travel and conduct field surveys. This strategy allowed the consolidation of resources to carry out both the counting and surveys in a single trip

Recommendations(if the practice is to be replicated)

-Taking into account the suggestions of surveyors when designing or modifying surveys is crucial. At times, it is better to conduct shorter surveys with essential information to gather more responses, than having less responses with more information.
-It is recommended to take into account information from administrative data and the beneficiary records of IOM to strengthen the context of the border. Particularly, information regarding figures of attention from agencies providing assistance and the government institutions present in the area.
-Conducting pilot exercises focused on the community is highly important. Actions involving participation and feedback from migrant communities were implemented throughout the process.

GCM Guiding Principles*

*All practices are to uphold the ten guiding principles of the GCM. This practice particularly exemplifies these listed principles.

Innovation

This kind of joint management represents an innovative response to the challenges arising in border areas with high volumes of people and complex geography. The methodology employed allows the distribution of capacities, teams, and resources efficiently, adapting to the geography by utilizing access points where collecting information is easier. In addition, the analysis of the tools to be implemented was collaborative, allowing a broader and comprehensive study of the information.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Date submitted:

18 January 2024

Disclaimer: The content of this practice reflects the views of the implementers and does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations, the United Nations Network on Migration, and its members.

 

 

*References to Kosovo shall be understood to be in the context of United Nations Security Council resolution 1244 (1999).